The OAH Magazine of History

Masthead Moh Nameplate Long

Human Rights

from the editor

Human Rights, by Phillip M. Guerty

This issue of the OAH Magazine of History examines definitions of human rights from World War II through the civil rights movement. As a quick scan of recent newspaper headlines reveals, debates about human rights are ever present in the world today. Whether in viewing reports about genocide and the crisis of Darfur, or coverage of recent political opposition and rioting in Tibet, our students need to have a strong understanding of the key role of human rights in these events and what this means for the United States, both from a historical perspective and in the world today. This is as true domestically as well, where--especially during this campaign season--discussions emerge about such issues as the right of all people to have access to high quality medical care or to earn a fair wage. Read more >

foreword

The Challenges and Joys of Teaching Human Rights,
by Allida M. Black
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articles

fdr’s Four Freedoms as a Human Rights Instrument,
by Elizabeth Borgwardt
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“Bread of Freedom”: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Human Rights,
by Thomas F. Jackson
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Forty Years Since King: Labor Rights are Human Rights,
by Michael Honey
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Human Rights: By Any Means Necessary,
by Andrea McEvoy Spero
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teaching resources

Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: Human Rights and the Creation of the United Nations,
by Ivy P. Urdang
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Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,
by Allida M. Black
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Human Rights: By Any Means Necessary,
by Andrea McEvoy Spero
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The Liberia Project: Students Take History and Human Rights Into Their Own Hands,
by Paul Benson
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teaching american history with documents from the gilder lehrman collection

Frederick Douglass Reflects on the Status of African Americans,
by Steven Mintz
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special feature

Thinking like a Historian: A Framework for Teaching and Learning,
by Nikki Mandell
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internet resources

Human Rights and the World Wide Web,
by Kathryn Smith

on the cover

In special ceremonies at the United Nations in 1958, Eleanor Roosevelt presents first copies of a publication, In Your Hands, a guidebook of the U.S. observance of the tenth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, to Ceylon’s Ambassador RSS Gunawardene (right), newly-elected chairman of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. In the center is professor Rene Cassin, Vice President of the Conseil D’Etat of France, French representative on the commission and its former chairman. Stressing that the “destiny of human rights” is in the hands of all citizens, Mrs. Roosevelt said “it is our hope that In Your Hands may inspire them to strengthen their relations with one another.” (Photograph Copyright © Bettmann/CORBIS.)