The OAH Magazine of History

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Black Power

from the editor

Black Power, by Phillip M. Guerty

This issue of the OAH Magazine of History examines the Black Power movement and, in so doing, brings to light new perspectives not only on Black Power, but also the broader context of the civil rights movement and the social, political, and cultural changes in the 1960s and 1970s. As guest editor Peniel Joseph notes, “Black Power represents one of the most important social, political and cultural movements in the twentieth century” and “permanently altered the contours of American identity, citizenship, and democracy.” In presenting this new view, Joseph has provided a wide range of provocative feature articles combined with practical teaching strategies. His introduction provides an excellent framework for teachers and students by pointing out the stereotypes usually associated with the Black Power movement versus the larger, more complex historical reality. He notes, for instance, that traditional scholarship has often painted the civil rights movement as “a moral and political good” and Black Power as “destructive, shortlived, and politically ineffectual.” Far from disconnected, however, the two movements often intersected and were part of a wide range of voices about change in the era of the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War. Read more >

foreword

Reinterpreting the Black Power Movement,
by Peniel E. Joseph
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articles

Historians and the Black Power Movement,
by Peniel E. Joseph
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“Some Abstract Thing Called Freedom”: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Legacy of the Black Panther Party,
by Yohuru Williams
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Black Women and Black Power,
by Rhonda Y. Williams
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teaching resources

Civil Rights, Black Power, and American Democracy,
by Peniel E. Joseph
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Was Thomas Jefferson a Black Panther?,
by Yohuru Williams
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Envisioning “The Black Woman” and Analyzing Voices of Protest,
by Rhonda Y. Williams
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From James Madison to Malcolm X: Black Power and the American Founding,
by Veronica Burchard
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special feature on oral history

Hip Hop and Oral History: Turning Students into “Griots for a New Age”,
by Mark Naison
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online features

The Black Panther Party: A Historiography for Teachers,
by Yohuru Williams

Black Women, Black Power: A Historiography for Teachers,
by Rhonda Y. Williams

DVD Review: Negroes With Guns: Rob Williams and Black Power,
by Hasan Kwame Jeffries

(From the October, 2006 OAH Magazine of History)

visit the guest editor’s website at:

http://www.penielejoseph.com/

on the cover

“Supporters of Huey Newton, Outside Courthouse,” July 15, 1968. Members of the Black Panther Party demonstrate on the steps of the Alameda County Courthouse in Oakland, California. Demonstrators are calling for the release of their leader, Huey Newton, who is on trial for allegedly killing an Oakland police officer during a gun battle. (Image courtesy of and copyrighted © by Bettmann/CORBIS.)